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Friday, 19 March 2021 14:29

Indigenous Comics Symposium

On March 24, the Department of English at the University of Toronto will host an online symposium on Indigenous Comics and Graphic Novels.

Kateri-Akiwenzie Damm, founder and managing editor of Kegedonce Press, will be a featured guest and speaker, as will Kegedonce author and illustrator Neal Shannacappo. Their works, This Place: 150 Years Retold (Highwater Press, imprint of Portage and Main Press) and The Krillian Key: Salamander Run (Kegedonce Press) are pictured here.

The symposium includes an impressive list of other speakers and contributors. Don't miss this great opportunity to hear Indigenous authors, artists, and scholars sharing their experiences and insights.

The event is free to attend, but registration is required. For more details and to register for the symposium, click here.

Indigenous Comics web header

Cover art for a brand new edition of a classic poetry collection...

When Louise B. Halfe offered Kegedonce Press her poetry collection Blue Marrow for re-publication, she suggested artwork by Métis artist Leah Dorion for the cover. Leah's piece, "Spirit Dancers," is a fitting match for the themes and subjects of Blue Marrow's poetry. Thanks to Leah's artwork, art direction by Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm, and the layout design by Chantal Lalonde, the brand-new third editon is one truly beautiful book.

In celebration of the release of the new edition of Blue Marrow, we spoke with Leah Dorion about her artwork. Here is that interview:

Kegedonce Press: Can you tell us a little bit about the piece, “Spirit Dancers”? What does it depict? What were your influences? Is there a story behind the painting? 

Leah Dorion: I just love Indigenous women's traditional dance forms especially the jingle dress and the fancy shawl. Every time I watch our women dance at cultural events and pow-wows my spirit is lifted, and this painting reflects how I feel when our women dance in our community.

KP: Is your artwork grounded in a specific culture, language, nation?  

LD: I am a Métis from central Saskatchewan so big prairie skies, bright sunny days, and strong prairie winds are well represented in this artwork, "Spirit Dancers." I also love the beautiful designs and colours of Indigenous women's traditional dance regalia thus, I used lots of repeating patterns and bright colours, and wind-current symbolism on the clothing designs worn by the three women figures in the painting.

KP: Can you tell us a little about your process? What are your materials? Where do you begin with a new painting?

LD: I have a crazy active imagination and I am never stuck for ideas. I usually put my ideas down on a rough sketch, then transfer them to good copy, and then let my intuition and spirit guide the final painting process. I am a big kid at heart so my work is playful and some of my favourite projects are illustrating children's books and of course representing Indigenous women's spirituality. Mother Earth and the Creator are my favourite artists; they both inspire me to be super creative.

KP: What is the most important thing you have learned through creating your artwork?

LD: I have learned patience and to stop any critical thinking during my artistic practice. I try to bring Mother Earth energy into my artistic practice and she really is a key muse in all my artworks.

KP: What pieces are you working on now, or most recently?

LD: I am finally exhibiting works from my 13 Moons art show which is a tribute to Indigenous women moon teachings. It has already had a showing at the Dunlop Gallery in Regina and some of the work is going into an art show in Edmonton this week. I hope to feature the show at both Batoche National Historic Park and Wanuskewin in the near future.

KP: What do you think of Blue Marrow and its use of your work?

LD: Since Louise has a traditional spirit name "Sky Dancer," I feel this painting was destined for this book, as two spirit women are dancing in the cornmeal blue sky which represents her traditional name so beautifully. As such, this painting is a great match for Blue Marrow as the colour symbolism used throughout the painting is blue dominant! I love how the woman with her fancy shawl opened up has Thunderbirds and blue stars on the inside of her spirit shawl. I also think the painting is a good match as the woman grounded in the earth is wearing all hues of blue. 

If you would like to see more of Leah's breathtaking artwork, check out her website at https://leahdorion.ca/.
Leah has a show opening online at Gallery@501 from March 11 to 24, 2021.

The painting, "Spirit Dancers" wraps around to the back cover of Blue Marrow. Here is an image of the full cover.

Blue Marrow Cover and back cover small

Wednesday, 03 February 2021 16:02

Welcome back, Nathan!

Nathan Niigan Noodin Adler returns with a brand new book!

In 2016, Nathan Niigan Noodin Adler published his debut novel, Wrist, with Kegedonce Press. A sweeping tale of monsters and legends from both Ojibwe and western culture, Wrist is an Indigenous horror novel that follows two story lines, past and present. In 1872, dinosaur hunters become embroiled in a battle over the discovery of fossils in Northern Ontario as their excavation crews are driven mad by a bizarre and terrifying illness. Over a hundred years later, Church and his family show signs of the same monstrous affliction. As he begins to unravel his family's dark history, Church must race to protect the secrets buried deep in bones and blood. 

Wrist is set in the fictional town of Sterling and on the fictional northern Ontario reserve of Ghost Lake.

Now, Nathan has returned to the setting and many of the themes of Wrist with his new short-story collection, Ghost Lake. Thirteen short stories, mirroring the thirteen moons of Ojibwe cosmology, feature a cast of interrelated characters and their brushes with mysterious forces, monsters and spirits. Pyromaniacs, vigilantes, grave robbers and ghosts appear among Ghost Lake's characters. A few of the main characters from Wrist make an appearance as well!

Kegedonce Press is thrilled to release this brand new short story collection, Ghost Lake, the companion volume to Wrist.

And a warm welcome back to Nathan!

Wrist and Ghost Lake

 Check out these articles on Wrist and Ghost Lake!

http://prismmagazine.ca/2016/11/10/horror-cultural-exploitation-science-humour-and-indigenous-legend-in-nathan-adlers-wrist/

http://open-book.ca/News/The-History-is-Present-in-Each-Moment-Nathan-Niigan-Noodin-Adler-on-His-Spectacular-New-Short-Fiction-Collection-Ghost-Lake

 

 

Tuesday, 20 October 2020 14:29

Welcome Neal Shannacappo!

Kegedonce Press extends a warm welcome to our latest author and artist, Neal Shannacappo!

Neal is the author and illustrator of The Krillian Key: Salamander Run, the first volume in The Krillian Key series of graphic novels, which will release in November. As this is also KK cover thumbnailKegedonce's first graphic novel, we are very excited to add this fun, sassy, and exciting book to our catalogue!

Neal Shannacappo is a Nakawe graphic novelist and poet from Rolling River FN in Manitoba. He's Eagle clan and currently living, working and playing in Ottawa. You can find his stories in the Indigenous anthologies called Sovereign Traces vol. 1 - Not (Just) (An)other and Vol. 2 – Relational Constellation both available at Chapters. Mashkiikii Miikana (Medicine Road) is online on the National Campus and Community Radio Stations website. The graphic novel Mashkawide'e (Has a strong heart) was published by Senator Kim Pate and copies can be found by contacting her office. At the moment he has 3 projects on the go, The Krillian Key which is his own creation, and If I Go Missing which is being published by James Lorimer & Company Ltd., and Niikaniganaw (All My Relations) commissioned by a group of healthcare researchers.

The Krillian Key: Salamander Run is set in a dystopic future circa 2242, with flashbacks to modern-day Canada. The story races along with its main character, the immortal Kyrill, also known as Salamander, as he fights to escape warring human/alien hybrids who wish to use Salamander for their own ends. Kyrill’s story unfolds on a war-ravaged and environmentally devastated Earth where his people, Indigenous North Americans, are space pirates who control the solar system’s spaceways. 

117792820 590855961556401 6530422492006185207 nsample image 3  

Friday, 19 June 2020 14:01

INDIGENOUS PRIDE

June is both National Indigenous History Month and Pride Month, and
Kegedonce Press is full of
INDIGENOUS PRIDE.
Here are a few of our fantastic 2SQ (LGBTQ2IA+) titles.

9781928120162you are enough: love poems for the end of the world IMG 5991 
by Smokii Sumac 

This collection of breathtakingly powerful poetry won the 2019 Indigenous Voices Award for Published Poetry in English. A profound, moving, eye-opening and often hilarious look at gender, sex, consent, identity and the feeling of coming home.

“Smokii Sumac's you are enough: love poems for the end of the world is filled with maps and stories of love-filled guidance for Indigenous LGBTQ2IA+ readers, which position the collection as one for and of the past, present, and future. It is a great privilege for the world to be gifted with this book, and we have the responsibility to read this collection, and, most importantly, to listen to and carry forward into the world the decolonial teachings, transformative potentialities, and deep deep love that Sumac's debut poetry book so generously and honestly provides.”
—Ashley Caranto Morford, Transmotion Journal. https://journals.kent.ac.uk/index.php/transmotion/article/view/748/1569

 

9781928120186 smaller Fireweed, by Tunchai Redvers Tunchai.1

Healing and hope and an offering of self-love: these are the gifts of the poetry of Fireweed. Through short, brilliantly crafted verses, Tunchai Redvers tells a story of adolescence, identity and the discovery of truth, safety, and connection. Dedicated to Indigenous women, youth and two-spirit people, Fireweed blossoms with renewal and hope.

“Tunchai writes from a place of truth, pride and wisdom. Tunchai takes the reader on a journey through some painful memories, but she also speaks to the resiliency of her Indigenous identity and spirit. We, as the reader are invited to witness significant life moments though her carefully selected words.”
—Online review by Jules Arita Koostachin, author of Unearthing Secrets, Gathering Truths.

 

9781928120056Wrist by Nathan Niigan Noodin Adler Nathan Adler photo crop

A fascinating, intricate and ambitious horror story that interweaves Indigenous history and legend with the past and present of colonialism. Here are monsters both historical and fantastical, and a coming of age story realized through characters that are deeply nuanced and real.

“Just as Wrist treats trauma in a complex and perceptive way, it develops multi-dimensional and utterly convincing characters. One risk in anything that falls partially within the bounds of genre fiction is flat, simplistic characters; Wrist entirely avoids this problem with its presentation of people as complicated palimpsests of their own and others’ histories. Wiindigo is layered onto human; Anglicized residential school names are layered over Indigenous names; trauma is sometimes covered over but never completely; and perhaps most memorably, larger cultural currents leave their stamps on individuals in ways that are realistic in that they are never fully explained.”
—Reviewed by Amy Mitchell, The Rusty Toque http://www.therustytoque.com/fiction-review-amy-mitchell.html

 

9781928120100 creole métisse of french canada, me, by Sharron Proulx-Turner b and 2 author photo 2

Passing symbolically from house to house with each poem, Sharron Proulx-Turner constructs a village of moments that tell of the histories, the people, the traditions of Métis in Canada. Intimate, profound, troubling and hopeful, this poetic memoir opens its doors to love, courage, growth and promise.

creole métisse is the first of her books that Sharron herself thought of as prose, or poetic prose. Like many of her previous books, this one explores two-spiritedness and Métis history and questions of identity, and is focussed as well on family history. The metaphor and reality of house(s) and home(s) are the through-line of the book, in which she interweaves stories of her Métis family ancestry with autobiography and, always, her trademark sharp critique.”
—Aruna Srivastava, "Poetry Cure" interview on All Lit Up. https://alllitup.ca/Blog/2018/Poetry-Cure-creole-metisse-of-french-canada-me-by-Sharron-Proulx-Turner

 

 

 

Five Weeks, Five Books
Celebrating Indigenous Poetry during National Poetry Month

April is National Poetry Month, and although it may seem like everything is suspended while we are practicing social distancing, we at Kegedonce heartily believe that we have more cause than ever to indulge in and celebrate poetry!

For five weeks, we are highlighting five of our recent poetry collections, one per week. Check out our website, Facebook and Instagram pages for images, excerpts and other tidbits about these five fabulous Indigenous poetry collections. Although we are not currently shipping orders from our local warehouse, all of our books can still be ordered online at All Lit Up. What better time to support Canadian poets and publishing! 

Week 5, you are enough: love poems for the end of the world, by Smokii Sumac

Winner of the 2019 Indigenous Voices Award in Published Poetry in English!

In his debut poetry collection you are enough: love poems for the end of the world, Smokii Sumac has curated a selection of works from two years of a near daily poetry practice. What began as a sort of daily online poetry journal using the hashtag #haikuaday, has since transformed into a brilliant collection of storytelling drawing upon Indigenous literary practice, and inspired by works like Billy Ray Belcourt's This Wound is a World, and Tenille Campbell's #IndianLovePoems.  With sections dealing with recovery from addiction and depression, coming home through ceremony, and of course, as the title suggests, on falling in and out of love, Sumac brings the reader through two years of life as a Ktunaxa Two-Spirit person. This collection will move you as Sumac addresses the grief of being an Indigenous person in Canada, shares timely (and sometimes hilarious) musings on consent, sex, and gender, introduces readers to people and places he has loved and learned from, and through it all, helps us all come to know that we are enough, just as we are. 

“Smokii Sumac offers our tired souls refuge, nourishment and hope in tiny successive bursts of light."
—Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, author of This Accident of Being Lost

Smokii Sumac and you are enough are currently featured on All Lit Up for National Poetry Month. Find an interview with Smokii here.50E7775F 6AF4 406A 884A 43C71610D7F9

Here is one of Smokii's amazing poems from you are enough: love poems for the end of the world:

how to support me today after Orlando

1.
do not bring up wounded knee, for that is my trauma, too. do not reach
into my gunshot wound unless it is to stop the bleeding and hold the
pieces of me together.

2.
do not perpetuate the hatred spat from the killer’s gun with your
responses. there is no space here for your racism. there is no space here
for your politics. there is no space here for your words unless they can
reach into this gunshot wound to stop the bleeding and hold the pieces
of me together.

3.
if you are gay, lesbian, bisexual, two-spirit, trans, latinx, or anyone else
who knows this violence the way we do, please take care of yourself.
if you have words to share, spread them around this world and into
our wounds. if you cannot speak, let your silence resonate into us. let
us hold each other together our blood mixing in rainbows of love and
solidarity in candlelight unburdened by fda bans on our freedom to
relate to one another. let us reach into these gunshot wounds to stop the
bleeding and hold the pieces of each other together.

4.
if you are white or straight or anyone to which this violence is
unfamiliar, stop.
take a breath.
take another.
breathe our words into yourself.
if you must share, then share our stories. repeat our names. listen to our
heartbeats and make space for us to mourn, grieve, and be with one
another.
do not speak.
do not speak.
do not speak.
do not speak unless you are absolutely certain that your words can reach
into our gunshot wounds and stop the bleeding. Do not act unless you
know that your action will hold the pieces of us together.

5.
this one’s for the grandmothers. grandfathers. aunties and uncles. for
all our older relations who remain neither man nor woman but some
fierce being in between. this one’s for the stonewallers. for the bulldykes.
for the drag queens and the elders. for all the ones who came before
for those whose words and lives made this world feel safer, if only
for a second. for those rainbow warriors (no, not you), who raised their
fists and flags and lit our way out of closets and into communities. we
remember.

remember to hope. remember to dance. remember to open our bodies
to the possibilities of another being, the same being, only different. wet,
hard, hot, heavy, soft, juicy, thick, layered, beautiful in it’s newness,
incredible in it’s familiarity, raw, powerful, and awesomely sexy.
remember that we can reach in. we can stop the bleeding. we will hold
the pieces of you together. #morelove. always.

 

Five Weeks, Five Books
Celebrating Indigenous Poetry during National Poetry Month

April is National Poetry Month, and although it may seem like everything is suspended while we are practicing social distancing, we at Kegedonce heartily believe that we have more cause than ever to indulge in and celebrate poetry!

For five weeks, we are highlighting five of our recent poetry collections, one per week. Check out our website, Facebook and Instagram pages for images, excerpts and other tidbits about these five fabulous Indigenous poetry collections. Although we are not currently shipping orders from our local warehouse, all of our books can still be ordered online at All Lit Up. What better time to support Canadian poets and publishing! 

Week 4, creole métisse of french canada, me, by Sharron Proulx-Turner.

I watch the snow fall outside my bedroom window,
a blank page in front of me,
when I should be singing

"In creole métisse of french canada, me, sharron proulx-turner leads us house by house through a village of stories, meeting family members, co-workers, elders and children, hearing personal and traditional tales of five generations of mixed-blood people of Canada." Joanne Arnott, author of Halfling Spring. 

creole métisse of french canada, me, by Métis poet Sharron Proulx-Turner is a powerful and moving collection of poetry written as memoir, in a unique prose-like fashion without capitalized words. Sharron writes of her time in grad school and the challenges she experienced with others’ opposing perspectives. She shares memories from her childhood, reflects on the role of writing in her life, and of her experiences as a two-spirit woman. Her personal stories invite the reader to understand both her life and Métis experience in Canada. Sharron passed away in 2016. Kegedonce Press published this, her last manuscript, in her memory. 

Sb and w author photoharron Proulx-Turner was a member of the Métis Nation of Alberta. Originally from the Ottawa river valley, Sharron was from Mohawk, Wyandat, Algonquin, Ojibwe, Mi'kmaw, French and Irish ancestry. Sharron was a two-spirit nokomis, mom, writer and community worker. Where the Rivers Join (1995), a memoir (Beckylane), was a finalist for the Edna Staebler Award for creative non-fiction, and what the auntys say (2002), was a finalist for the Gerald Lampert Prize for poetry. 

An excerpt from "A house full of birds," from creole métisse of french canada, me:

“I wish I could be that brave. as brave as the big dipper. the great bear there, purring, watching, holding my hand. me looking to the side and down. the words I seek are buried there, under grief. inside the darkness of a cottonwood, inside the seeds of orange berries. the wings of a female mallard in flight, exposing blues and whites and blacks otherwise unseen, like a woman's beauty, often hidden until she looks up, sees the small spaces between the leaves, yellow hearts on the black bark after a fall rain.”

Sharron Proulx-Turner

 

Five Weeks, Five Books
Celebrating Indigenous Poetry during National Poetry Month

April is National Poetry Month, and although it may seem like everything is suspended while we are practicing social distancing, we at Kegedonce heartily believe that we have more cause than ever to indulge in and celebrate poetry!

For five weeks, we are highlighting five of our recent poetry collections, one per week. Check out our website, Facebook and Instagram pages for images, excerpts and other tidbits about these five fabulous Indigenous poetry collections. Although we are not currently shipping orders from our local warehouse, all of our books can still be ordered online at All Lit Up. What better time to support Canadian poets and publishing! 

Week 3, Sitting by the Rapids, by Albert Dumont.
"Poetry is the raging rapids and it is the little fish which doesn’t give up until the turbulent waters are behind it. Poetry is purpose, renewal and rebirth. sitting by the rapids is all of this and offers insight into the mind of an Indigenous man who lives with severe chronic pain and who found the strength through spirituality and poetry to put a life of alcohol abuse behind him forever." Albert Dumont. 

Dumont’s poems are raw, direct reflections on painful experience and the strength and hope that arises from facing and overcoming them. This poetry is powerful and emotional; it exposes the heart of a man who has faced tremendous difficulties and prevailed.

Dumont writes, “The ancestors living at the time of European contact had a way with words. Poetry spilled effortlessly from their lips because the spirit of the land guided their words. I take seriously my belief that medicine of extraordinary healing power is found in the verses of a poet who puts words together for the purpose of bringing peace and serenity to people in want of it. The counsels and poetry of a person living with pain are special and more meaningful to an individual in the throes of heartache.”

Maria Campbell, author of the classic memoir Halfbreed, had this to say about sitting by the rapids: “These gentle words full of love and powerful energy are like Albert himself. They encourage and guide the way for all who read them and are prepared to move on.”

Poet, activist, and spiritual advisor Albert Dumont is one of thirteen Elders on the Elders Advisory Committee of the Ministry of the Attorney General. In recognition for hisAlbert Dumont author photo thumbnail work as an activist and volunteer on his ancestral lands (Ottawa and Region) Albert was presented with a Human Rights Award by the Public Service Alliance of Canada in 2010. In January 2017 he received the DreamKEEPERS Citation for Outstanding Leadership. He is the author of several other books including Of Trees and their Wisdom, 2009.

A poem from sitting by the rapids: 

where is the bird

Where is the lake
I can wade into
And emerge
My heart filled with righteousness

Where is the trail
In the thick woods
Leading to the circle
Where my spirit
Can replenish itself with courage and truth

Where is the bird
Which would lift me upon its back
So I can fly with it
Searching for the place
Where I can discover again
Purpose and a reinvigorated sense of humanity

My friend, the lake you search for
Is any of your territory

The trail leading to the circle
Is the only trail necessary

The bird you seek
Is the eagle

It calls to you

 

Five Weeks, Five Books
Celebrating Indigenous Poetry during National Poetry Month

April is National Poetry Month, and although it may seem like everything is suspended while we are practicing social distancing, we at Kegedonce heartily believe that we have more cause than ever to indulge in and celebrate poetry!

For five weeks, we are highlighting five of our recent poetry collections, one per week. Check out our website, Facebook and Instagram pages for images, excerpts and other tidbits about these five fabulous Indigenous poetry collections. Although we are not currently shipping orders from our local warehouse, all of our books can still be ordered online at All Lit Up. What better time to support Canadian poets and publishing! 

Week 2, Unearthing Secrets, Gathering Truths, by Jules Arita Koostachin.
Finalist for the 2019 Indigenous Voices Award in Published Poetry in English.

In her debut poetry collection, Unearthing Secrets, Gathering Truths, writer, scholar, filmmaker and poet Jules Koostachin delves into trauma and healing, haunting childhood memories, and survival. These poems were twenty years in the making, a journey that enabled Koostachin to transform intergenerational trauma in the aftermath of the residential school system into strength, hope, and resilience. Her style, which she calls "broken poetry," visually underscores the process of that journey, and frequently includes words, lines, and phrases in Cree. 

"Through the honesty of her words, she embraces the spirit world, the resilience of her foremothers, the integral healing powers of disassociation as a survival mechanism, and the richness of her mitewin – dreams, which reconnect her to herself. Through her poetry, she has found the courage to face her difficult past, and now as a mother, she is gathering the truths of her family to help in the healing process" (Unearthing Secrets, Gathering Truths, 2018).JAK author photo thumbnail

Reviewer Zainab Amadahy writes, "Koostachin shares with us personal, raw and heartfelt writings. Familiar yet unique, the reader takes away from these stories a grounded appreciation for how sharing can be empowering and, simultaneously, a process of finding deep meaning in one’s most horrific experiences. Despite its gravity, Koostachin’s first book is not a difficult read but more of a detoxification, a shedding of skin that reveals the exquisite beauty of Mino-bimaadiziwin beneath" (Muskrat Magazine, November 10, 2018). 

A poem from Unearthing Secrets, Gathering Truths:

WiKwam

IsKweWak
slowly emerging
tundra hugs their cold bare feet
absorbing the red soil
swallowing the warmth
centering the being
walls tied together with sinew
intestine
leather becomes my veil
veil of red AsKi
Earth
camoflaging
protection
steering me away from the lies
untruths told
misleading stories of us
the human beings
MoshKeKoWak
InNiNeWak
standing tall together
WiKwam

Five Weeks, Five Books
Celebrating Indigenous Poetry during National Poetry Month

April is National Poetry Month, and although it may seem like everything is suspended while we are practicing social distancing, we at Kegedonce heartily believe that we have more cause than ever to indulge in and celebrate poetry!

For the next five weeks, we will highlight five of our most recent poetry collections, one per week. Check out our website, Facebook and Instagram pages for images, excerpts and other tidbits about these five fabulous Indigenous poetry collections. Although we are not currently shipping orders from our local warehouse, all of our books can still be ordered online at All Lit Up. What better time to support Canadian poets and publishing! 

Week 1, Fireweed, by Tunchai Redvers.

9781928120186 smaller              It’s an almost miraculous sight, the flowering of fireweed across fire-blackened mountainsides in Canada’s north. Tunchai Redvers has taken this image of hope, healing, and beauty following crisis as a framework for her debut collection of poetry. Consisting of short, sometimes raw, but always hopeful poems, this collection traces experiences of pain, rebirth, re-grounding and spreading the seeds of healing. Dedicated to Indigenous youth, women, and two-spirit people, Fireweed offers a message of pride and self-love.
             Tunchai Redvers is the co-founder of We Matter, an advocacy organization that supports Indigenous youth.

 

Selected poem from Fireweed:

wrap your body
around your heart
and feel blood memory
as ancestors flow
through your veins

times are hard
but say my love
they hold you
with resilient hands
that know pain
and just as they do
i believe in you

feel gentleness
to your anger
sing belonging
to your sadness
speak words of love
to your hurting heart
as they do

you
like them
are capable
of facing darknessTunchai author photo smaller
with kindness
like northern lights
spirit dancing
as heart takes time to rest

              --Tunchai Redvers, Fireweed.  

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